2022 Minnawarra Art Awards Winners

2022 Award Winners

The City of ArMADALE WOULD LIKE TO CONGRATULATE THE WINNERS OF THE 2022 Minnawarra Art AWARDS.

City of Armadale Art Award

Winner: Christophe Canato

Artwork: Malapropism #2

Artist Statement: Canato’s work is a longstanding examination of the male gender role in cultural contexts.

What questions this artist is the notion of belonging or rejection, and the status that man is supposed to hold in society, as well as the power of staging the male body in order to deliver physical and emotional compositions such as idolatry, fantasies, grotesque or oppressiveness.

In his series Malapropism, males sit on powered and leadership roles. To achieve his status based on admiration and respect, a man has to be competitive, leaving little room for sensitivity and femininity.

Judges’ Comments: A powerful layered image that questions our perceptions of masculinity in a universal context.

Local Artist Award

Winner: Clinton Price

Artwork: Saying Goodbye

Artist Statement: Precious moment between mother and son connected as one skin to skin breathing in rhythm as time is slipping away. Within a day Joey will be gone, passing over to walk amongst the heavenly clouds.
Joey is my son born at 34 weeks with an incurable heart disease. We hoped to take him home, we hoped for time. At seven weeks the news was delivered nothing could be done and Joey would be removed from breathing supports and placed in palliative care.
We spent eight days making memories and being a family, for me the camera was my support, the crutch to lean on to capture precious memories. Through my art I was able to capture and reflect on the most special moment and most defining time in my life. Saying Goodbye captures the breaking heart of a mother and the unbreakable bond of mother and child.

Judges’ Comments: Intriguing tender work that captivates you before becoming fully aware of what is being portrayed. The technique is beautiful, with careful lighting and composition, contained within the soft rounded corners of the aluminium panel.

Aboriginal Artist Award

Winner: Sydney Phillips

Artwork: Despair

Artist Statement: My personal despair…for desecrated land, displaced family, and lost culture. Is the light shining upon me or is it leaking away? Time will tell.

Judges’ Comments: This is an intimate and personal work. He has communicated his journey within the artistic process while reflecting on his own culture.

Gerry Gauntlet Award

Winner: Michael Francas

Artwork: Now Where Are We? #1

Artist Statement: Now where are we? As exiles we negotiate our strange surroundings by drawing on all our intuition and analytical powers while struggling forward with feelings of longing in the search for belonging. My arts practice explores these themes through the medium of abstracted ‘landscapes’ and a painting process that prioritizes improvisation and ambiguity to achieve results which aim to inspire curiosity and contemplation.

Landscape elements such as nature versus the built environment are expressed ambiguously through the interplay of various colours and geometries. Like a wandering exile armed only with a paintbrush I create the strange new landscape of my mind as I traverse it every now and then pausing to reflect … now where are we?

Judges’ Comments: A mature timeless vision, with deliberate rawness within the execution.

Highly Commended Award

Winner: Matthew McAlpine

Artwork: Ash Abounds

Artist Statement: Ash Abounds, continues on from McAlpine’s recent body of work, Beneath the Radiant Southern Cross. The series of paintings attempt to reflect upon the intersection and toxicity of colonialism and nationalism in contemporary Australia.

Ash Abounds, rendered in a selective palette with a thick and gritty surface attempts to poetically reference landscape, bushfires and the leaching of toxins into the environment. The use of high-vis colours references the fossil fuel industry and their complicity in environmental degradation and exploitation. Embedded in the middle of the work are the words Ash Abounds, playfully reworking words from the Australian national anthem in attempt to reference the role that political inaction on climate change has had on the frequency and severity of recent bushfires.

Judges’ Comments: A silent visual protest that addresses major topics that concern humanity.

A huge congratulations to all of our winners!

Find out more about the Minnawarra Art Awards and plan your trip to view the exhibition here.

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